ipv4

ipv4 — IPv4 Settings

Properties

Table 83. 

Key Name Value Type Default Value Value Description
address-data
array of vardict
Array of IPv4 addresses. Each address dictionary contains at least 'address' and 'prefix' entries, containing the IP address as a string, and the prefix length as a uint32. Additional attributes may also exist on some addresses.
addresses
array of array of uint32
Deprecated in favor of the 'address-data' and 'gateway' properties, but this can be used for backward-compatibility with older daemons. Note that if you send this property the daemon will ignore 'address-data' and 'gateway'. Array of IPv4 address structures. Each IPv4 address structure is composed of 3 32-bit values; the first being the IPv4 address (network byte order), the second the prefix (1 - 32), and last the IPv4 gateway (network byte order). The gateway may be left as 0 if no gateway exists for that subnet.
dad-timeout
int32
-1
Timeout in milliseconds used to check for the presence of duplicate IP addresses on the network. If an address conflict is detected, the activation will fail. A zero value means that no duplicate address detection is performed, -1 means the default value (either configuration ipvx.dad-timeout override or zero). A value greater than zero is a timeout in milliseconds. The property is currently implemented only for IPv4.
dhcp-client-id
string
A string sent to the DHCP server to identify the local machine which the DHCP server may use to customize the DHCP lease and options. When the property is a hex string ('aa:bb:cc') it is interpreted as a binary client ID, in which case the first byte is assumed to be the 'type' field as per RFC 2132 section 9.14 and the remaining bytes may be an hardware address (e.g. '01:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx' where 1 is the Ethernet ARP type and the rest is a MAC address). If the property is not a hex string it is considered as a non-hardware-address client ID and the 'type' field is set to 0. The special values "mac" and "perm-mac" are supported, which use the current or permanent MAC address of the device to generate a client identifier with type ethernet (01). Currently, these options only work for ethernet type of links. The special value "duid" generates a RFC4361-compliant client identifier based on a hash of the interface name as IAID and /etc/machine-id. The special value "stable" is supported to generate a type 0 client identifier based on the stable-id (see connection.stable-id) and a per-host key. If you set the stable-id, you may want to include the "${DEVICE}" or "${MAC}" specifier to get a per-device key. If unset, a globally configured default is used. If still unset, the default depends on the DHCP plugin.
dhcp-fqdn
string
If the "dhcp-send-hostname" property is TRUE, then the specified FQDN will be sent to the DHCP server when acquiring a lease. This property and "dhcp-hostname" are mutually exclusive and cannot be set at the same time.
dhcp-hostname
string
If the "dhcp-send-hostname" property is TRUE, then the specified name will be sent to the DHCP server when acquiring a lease. This property and "dhcp-fqdn" are mutually exclusive and cannot be set at the same time.
dhcp-hostname-flags
uint32
0
Flags for the DHCP hostname and FQDN. Currently this property only includes flags to control the FQDN flags set in the DHCP FQDN option. Supported FQDN flags are NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_SERV_UPDATE (0x1), NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_ENCODED (0x2) and NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_NO_UPDATE (0x4). When no FQDN flag is set and NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_CLEAR_FLAGS (0x8) is set, the DHCP FQDN option will contain no flag. Otherwise, if no FQDN flag is set and NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_CLEAR_FLAGS (0x8) is not set, the standard FQDN flags are set in the request: NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_SERV_UPDATE (0x1), NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_ENCODED (0x2) for IPv4 and NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_FQDN_SERV_UPDATE (0x1) for IPv6. When this property is set to the default value NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_NONE (0x0), a global default is looked up in NetworkManager configuration. If that value is unset or also NM_DHCP_HOSTNAME_FLAG_NONE (0x0), then the standard FQDN flags described above are sent in the DHCP requests.
dhcp-iaid
string
A string containing the "Identity Association Identifier" (IAID) used by the DHCP client. The property is a 32-bit decimal value or a special value among "mac", "perm-mac", "ifname" and "stable". When set to "mac" (or "perm-mac"), the last 4 bytes of the current (or permanent) MAC address are used as IAID. When set to "ifname", the IAID is computed by hashing the interface name. The special value "stable" can be used to generate an IAID based on the stable-id (see connection.stable-id), a per-host key and the interface name. When the property is unset, the value from global configuration is used; if no global default is set then the IAID is assumed to be "ifname". Note that at the moment this property is ignored for IPv6 by dhclient, which always derives the IAID from the MAC address.
dhcp-send-hostname
boolean
TRUE
If TRUE, a hostname is sent to the DHCP server when acquiring a lease. Some DHCP servers use this hostname to update DNS databases, essentially providing a static hostname for the computer. If the "dhcp-hostname" property is NULL and this property is TRUE, the current persistent hostname of the computer is sent.
dhcp-timeout
int32
0
A timeout for a DHCP transaction in seconds. If zero (the default), a globally configured default is used. If still unspecified, a device specific timeout is used (usually 45 seconds). Set to 2147483647 (MAXINT32) for infinity.
dns
array of uint32
Array of IP addresses of DNS servers (as network-byte-order integers)
dns-options
array of string
Array of DNS options as described in man 5 resolv.conf. NULL means that the options are unset and left at the default. In this case NetworkManager will use default options. This is distinct from an empty list of properties.
dns-priority
int32
0
DNS servers priority. The relative priority for DNS servers specified by this setting. A lower value is better (higher priority). Zero selects a globally configured default value. If the latter is missing or zero too, it defaults to 50 for VPNs and 100 for other connections. Note that the priority is to order DNS settings for multiple active connections. It does not disambiguate multiple DNS servers within the same connection profile. When using dns=default, servers with higher priority will be on top of resolv.conf. To prioritize a given server over another one within the same connection, just specify them in the desired order. When multiple devices have configurations with the same priority, VPNs will be considered first, then devices with the best (lowest metric) default route and then all other devices. Negative values have the special effect of excluding other configurations with a greater priority value; so in presence of at least one negative priority, only DNS servers from connections with the lowest priority value will be used. When using a DNS resolver that supports Conditional Forwarding as dns=dnsmasq or dns=systemd-resolved, each connection is used to query domains in its search list. Queries for domains not present in any search list are routed through connections having the '~.' special wildcard domain, which is added automatically to connections with the default route (or can be added manually). When multiple connections specify the same domain, the one with the highest priority (lowest numerical value) wins. If a connection specifies a domain which is subdomain of another domain with a negative DNS priority value, the subdomain is ignored.
dns-search
array of string
Array of DNS search domains. Domains starting with a tilde ('~') are considered 'routing' domains and are used only to decide the interface over which a query must be forwarded; they are not used to complete unqualified host names.
gateway
string
The gateway associated with this configuration. This is only meaningful if "addresses" is also set.
ignore-auto-dns
boolean
FALSE
When "method" is set to "auto" and this property to TRUE, automatically configured nameservers and search domains are ignored and only nameservers and search domains specified in the "dns" and "dns-search" properties, if any, are used.
ignore-auto-routes
boolean
FALSE
When "method" is set to "auto" and this property to TRUE, automatically configured routes are ignored and only routes specified in the "routes" property, if any, are used.
may-fail
boolean
TRUE
If TRUE, allow overall network configuration to proceed even if the configuration specified by this property times out. Note that at least one IP configuration must succeed or overall network configuration will still fail. For example, in IPv6-only networks, setting this property to TRUE on the NMSettingIP4Config allows the overall network configuration to succeed if IPv4 configuration fails but IPv6 configuration completes successfully.
method
string
IP configuration method. NMSettingIP4Config and NMSettingIP6Config both support "disabled", "auto", "manual", and "link-local". See the subclass-specific documentation for other values. In general, for the "auto" method, properties such as "dns" and "routes" specify information that is added on to the information returned from automatic configuration. The "ignore-auto-routes" and "ignore-auto-dns" properties modify this behavior. For methods that imply no upstream network, such as "shared" or "link-local", these properties must be empty. For IPv4 method "shared", the IP subnet can be configured by adding one manual IPv4 address or otherwise 10.42.x.0/24 is chosen. Note that the shared method must be configured on the interface which shares the internet to a subnet, not on the uplink which is shared.
never-default
boolean
FALSE
If TRUE, this connection will never be the default connection for this IP type, meaning it will never be assigned the default route by NetworkManager.
route-data
array of vardict
Array of IPv4 routes. Each route dictionary contains at least 'dest' and 'prefix' entries, containing the destination IP address as a string, and the prefix length as a uint32. Most routes will also have a 'gateway' entry, containing the gateway IP address as a string. If the route has a 'metric' entry (containing a uint32), that will be used as the metric for the route (otherwise NM will pick a default value appropriate to the device). Additional attributes may also exist on some routes.
route-metric
int64
-1
The default metric for routes that don't explicitly specify a metric. The default value -1 means that the metric is chosen automatically based on the device type. The metric applies to dynamic routes, manual (static) routes that don't have an explicit metric setting, address prefix routes, and the default route. Note that for IPv6, the kernel accepts zero (0) but coerces it to 1024 (user default). Hence, setting this property to zero effectively mean setting it to 1024. For IPv4, zero is a regular value for the metric.
route-table
uint32
0
Enable policy routing (source routing) and set the routing table used when adding routes. This affects all routes, including device-routes, IPv4LL, DHCP, SLAAC, default-routes and static routes. But note that static routes can individually overwrite the setting by explicitly specifying a non-zero routing table. If the table setting is left at zero, it is eligible to be overwritten via global configuration. If the property is zero even after applying the global configuration value, policy routing is disabled for the address family of this connection. Policy routing disabled means that NetworkManager will add all routes to the main table (except static routes that explicitly configure a different table). Additionally, NetworkManager will not delete any extraneous routes from tables except the main table. This is to preserve backward compatibility for users who manage routing tables outside of NetworkManager.
routes
array of array of uint32
Deprecated in favor of the 'route-data' property, but this can be used for backward-compatibility with older daemons. Note that if you send this property the daemon will ignore 'route-data'. Array of IPv4 route structures. Each IPv4 route structure is composed of 4 32-bit values; the first being the destination IPv4 network or address (network byte order), the second the destination network or address prefix (1 - 32), the third being the next-hop (network byte order) if any, and the fourth being the route metric. If the metric is 0, NM will choose an appropriate default metric for the device. (There is no way to explicitly specify an actual metric of 0 with this property.)