Tooltip

A toolbar with a tooltip (with an image) for a button.

This example builds on the Toolbar example.

Code used to generate this example

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from gi.repository import Gtk
from gi.repository import Gdk
from gi.repository import Gio
import sys


class MyWindow(Gtk.ApplicationWindow):

    def __init__(self, app):
        Gtk.Window.__init__(
            self, title="Toolbar with Tooltips Example", application=app)
        self.set_default_size(400, 200)

        grid = Gtk.Grid()

        toolbar = self.create_toolbar()
        toolbar.set_hexpand(True)
        toolbar.show()

        grid.attach(toolbar, 0, 0, 1, 1)

        self.add(grid)

        undo_action = Gio.SimpleAction.new("undo", None)
        undo_action.connect("activate", self.undo_callback)
        self.add_action(undo_action)

        fullscreen_action = Gio.SimpleAction.new("fullscreen", None)
        fullscreen_action.connect("activate", self.fullscreen_callback)
        self.add_action(fullscreen_action)

    def create_toolbar(self):
        toolbar = Gtk.Toolbar()
        toolbar.get_style_context().add_class(Gtk.STYLE_CLASS_PRIMARY_TOOLBAR)

        # button for the "new" action
        new_button = Gtk.ToolButton.new_from_stock(Gtk.STOCK_NEW)
        # with a tooltip with a given text
        new_button.set_tooltip_text("Create a new file")
        new_button.set_is_important(True)
        toolbar.insert(new_button, 0)
        new_button.show()
        new_button.set_action_name("app.new")

        # button for the "open" action
        open_button = Gtk.ToolButton.new_from_stock(Gtk.STOCK_OPEN)
        # with a tooltip with a given text in the Pango markup language
        open_button.set_tooltip_markup("Open an <i>existing</i> file")
        open_button.set_is_important(True)
        toolbar.insert(open_button, 1)
        open_button.show()
        open_button.set_action_name("app.open")

        # button for the "undo" action
        undo_button = Gtk.ToolButton.new_from_stock(Gtk.STOCK_UNDO)
        # with a tooltip with an image
        # set True the property "has-tooltip"
        undo_button.set_property("has-tooltip", True)
        # connect to the callback function that for the tooltip
        # with the signal "query-tooltip"
        undo_button.connect("query-tooltip", self.undo_tooltip_callback)
        undo_button.set_is_important(True)
        toolbar.insert(undo_button, 2)
        undo_button.show()
        undo_button.set_action_name("win.undo")

        # button for the "fullscreen/leave fullscreen" action
        self.fullscreen_button = Gtk.ToolButton.new_from_stock(
            Gtk.STOCK_FULLSCREEN)
        self.fullscreen_button.set_is_important(True)
        toolbar.insert(self.fullscreen_button, 3)
        self.fullscreen_button.set_action_name("win.fullscreen")

        return toolbar

    # the callback function for the tooltip of the "undo" button
    def undo_tooltip_callback(self, widget, x, y, keyboard_mode, tooltip):
        # set the text for the tooltip
        tooltip.set_text("Undo your last action")
        # set an icon for the tooltip
        tooltip.set_icon_from_stock("gtk-undo", Gtk.IconSize.MENU)
        # show the tooltip
        return True

    def undo_callback(self, action, parameter):
        print("You clicked \"Undo\".")

    def fullscreen_callback(self, action, parameter):
        is_fullscreen = self.get_window().get_state(
        ) & Gdk.WindowState.FULLSCREEN != 0
        if not is_fullscreen:
            self.fullscreen_button.set_stock_id(Gtk.STOCK_LEAVE_FULLSCREEN)
            self.fullscreen()
        else:
            self.fullscreen_button.set_stock_id(Gtk.STOCK_FULLSCREEN)
            self.unfullscreen()


class MyApplication(Gtk.Application):

    def __init__(self):
        Gtk.Application.__init__(self)

    def do_activate(self):
        win = MyWindow(self)
        win.show_all()

    def do_startup(self):
        Gtk.Application.do_startup(self)

        new_action = Gio.SimpleAction.new("new", None)
        new_action.connect("activate", self.new_callback)
        app.add_action(new_action)

        open_action = Gio.SimpleAction.new("open", None)
        open_action.connect("activate", self.open_callback)
        app.add_action(open_action)

    def new_callback(self, action, parameter):
        print("You clicked \"New\".")

    def open_callback(self, action, parameter):
        print("You clicked \"Open\".")

app = MyApplication()
exit_status = app.run(sys.argv)
sys.exit(exit_status)

Useful methods for a Tooltip widget

set_tooltip_text(text) and set_tooltip_markup(text) can be used to add a tooltip of plain text (or text in the Pango Markup Language) to a widget.

For more complex tooltips, for instance for a tooltip with an image:

  1. Set the "has-tooltip" property of the widget to True; this will make GTK+ monitor the widget for motion and related events which are needed to determine when and where to show a tooltip.

  2. Connect to the "query-tooltip" signal. This signal will be emitted when a tooltip is supposed to be shown. One of the arguments passed to the signal handler is a GtkTooltip object. This is the object that we are about to display as a tooltip, and can be manipulated in your callback using functions like set_icon(). There are functions for setting the tooltip's markup (set_markup(text)), setting an image from a stock icon (set_icon_from_stock(stock_id, size)), or even putting in a custom widget (set_custom(widget)).

  3. Return True from your query-tooltip handler. This causes the tooltip to be show. If you return False, it will not be shown.

In the probably rare case where you want to have even more control over the tooltip that is about to be shown, you can set your own GtkWindow which will be used as tooltip window. This works as follows:

  1. Set "has-tooltip" and connect to "query-tooltip" as before.

  2. Use set_tooltip_window() on the widget to set a GtkWindow created by you as tooltip window.

  3. In the "query-tooltip" callback you can access your window using get_tooltip_window() and manipulate as you wish. The semantics of the return value are exactly as before, return True to show the window, False to not show it.

API References

In this sample we used the following: